Educational Benefits of Performing Arts in Childhood and 10 Tips to Encourage Creativity | Arts Education

Children have an almost non- stop desire to be creative. They live in a mental space that is constantly curious, expressive, physical, at play, and engaged. The importance of nurturing this creativity is well documented and has amazing benefits. A child who is exposed to and involved in the performing arts often develops a greater capacity for learning. Through the arts, children are encouraged to depend on themselves creatively, so they learn how to solve problems better, while developing the ability to rely on themselves to bring new ideas into the world. They learn to listen to their own compass; speak from their souls.This is not to say that all children should become professional performers. It simply means when children participate in the performing arts they become better equipped to look at the world from many different vantage points. The arts also innately provide a spiritual component. When a child engages in performing arts activities they are stripped of pretenses and they speak from the heart.


Then, there are the academic benefits. The following is from Americans for the Arts:
Young people who participate in the arts for at least three hours on three days each week through at least one full year are:4 times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement
3 times more likely to be elected to class office within their schools
4 times more likely to participate in a math and science fair
3 times more likely to win an award for school attendance
4 times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or poemAdd to these the benefits to brain development and you have a recipe for children who grow up to give the world amazing gifts.The following is a list I have put together to give you a little nudge in the direction of engaging your child in the performing arts:10 Tips to Nurture Your Creative Child:
Encourage play acting and dress up; this stimulates a child’s imagination.
Create a special “acting out” area in your home. Build a mini-stage, hang curtains from ceiling hooks, throw some dress-up clothes in a costume chest and voila; instant theatre for your little thespians.
Encourage your child(ren) to compose or make up their own songs and rhymes.
Put on some beautiful instrumental music; classical or jazz, grab crayons or paints, some craft paper and have your child “draw what they hear”. This allows them to become lost in the music and makeup their own story. Then ask them what they heard. This will help them develop their story telling ability.
Encourage repetition. Kids love to find a song or something they find funny and do it again and again and again. Embrace this quality.
Read every day to your children. A comprehensive use of language skills and word play are critical for all children, including the budding artist, and one gets this from reading consistently.
When reading rhymes, poetry, Dr. Seuss, A.A. Milne, etc. to your child, emphasize the rhythms. Rhyming books, stories, poetry are inherently musical which helps to develop a child’s “ear” for language.
Our voices are capable of a myriad of sounds. When reading to your children use different vocal qualities and dialects. Don’t worry; it doesn’t have to be perfect! Kid’s just love it when you act out and use different voices for different characters.
Take your time when you read to your children. When you immerse yourself in a story, they will follow suit.
Stop at a cliff hanger when reading narrative so they can’t wait to hear the next installment.


I sure hope this helps to inspire and encourage you to get your child involved in the performing arts. My own experience with the arts has enriched my life beyond measure and I believe that is because my mother started me with an appreciation of books, classical music, and the performing arts at a very young age. Thanks Mom!

Make Music in the Recording Arts | Arts Education

Whether you’re interested in studio recording, concert sound, movie sound, radio and TV broadcasting, artist management, or working with a record label, you’ll get the career preparation you need at recording arts schools.Just be sure to put your tech hat on — the advent of digital recording, editing, and broadcasting has changed the landscape of the recording arts. Computer software now performs many of the recording and editing functions once reserved for specialized electronic equipment. And instead of video and audiotapes, most radio and TV stations utilize hard drives and other computer data storage systems. Because of this, you’ll need a solid background in computer networking and software to lay the foundation for recording arts careers.


Recording arts schools offer intensive audio education that covers every facet of music and audio production, from tracking and overdubs to mixing and mastering. The professional recording studios at recording arts schools allow you to record bands using the same microphones, mixing boards, and digital audio workstations used in studios all over the world. In recording arts schools, you’ll also explore the techniques involved in working with audio for video games as well as audio post-production for movies and TV shows.Recording arts curriculum typically covers audio recording and production, digital recording, music business, and sound reinforcement. With the proper training from recording arts schools, you could become a broadcast engineer, dialogue editor, foley editor, foley recordist, location sound engineer, mastering engineer, mix engineer, music editor, recording engineer, sound designer, sound effects editor, sound recordist, or a number of other vocations in the recording arts.Once you’ve launched one of these recording arts careers, you may choose to pursue professional certification. The Society of Broadcast Engineers offers the Certified Audio Engineer designation for experienced recording arts technicians who pass a proficiency exam. The exam consists of 50 multiple-choice questions on operating practices, problems, theory, and safety.


And there’s never been a better time to pursue recording arts careers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of sound engineering technicians is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2014. Median annual earnings of professionals with these recording arts careers were $38,110 in May 2004; the highest 10 percent earned more than $80,450.